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Bookshelf – Radical Remission So Far

One of the book’s I’ve been trying to get through is Radical Remission: Surviving Cancer Against All Odds by Dr. Kelly Turner. While I would like to think the odds are, well, “ever in my favor” to borrow from another good read, I have really enjoyed looking beyond the chemotherapy and radiation to survivor’s stories of radical remission. Dr. Turner sort of defines a Radical Remission as when someone heals cancer against all odds.

This has been another read that I certainly have to be in the right frame of mind to read through. I purchased the book electronically using a gift card I was gifted by a friend, so I am able to read it occasionally when I have a few minutes on my phone or the iPad depending where and when that may happen. I’m still getting into accepting the electronic book thing! Dr. Turner provides 9 key factors that she found common among nearly all the Radical Remission survivors she studied.

When I started reading, I kind of knew what sort of factors would be discussed based on who had recommended the book and what little I do know about their story. Since it has taken me some time to get through and I have definitely read it in a very broken up way, not even an entire section or story at a time, I will need to go back and look at areas that I know I need to work on. I think that every patient, person for that matter, should do some of these things, like Taking Control of Your Health and Following Your Intuition.

I am in the midst of the seventh factor, Embracing Social Support. This one has been pretty interesting in how simple yet complex it is to accept help and support. I know in my experience, it is not always easy to ask for help or accept the offers and give specifics that yes, I need your help and this is what I need you to do. But when you are going through cancer, you get offers of “Let me know if you need anything” from family, friends, and even those acquaintances that turn into your biggest supporters! It is hard to make that call and say, “Hi, it’s me. We could really use ____.” Our biggest help, aside from thoughts and prayers, has been from people who went ahead and just did, because honestly, I have no idea what we need other than love and support. Apparently that love and support being everything is not something that just applies to me. It can be the difference in someone’s life. “Just” a hug, as a form of physical touch, releases hormones to help heal. Feeling the love and support of everyone has literally released hormones to help me heal!

One of the areas I have found most difficult is the herbs and supplements. I do not have the expertise to know what I should be taking, and my oncologist has not provided any guidance when I have asked. I only get similar answers to the questions I ask about diet and nutrition. Both of those areas, other than eating a healthy well balanced diet, seem to be missing from traditional medicine for breast cancer. There is the ongoing debates of both soy and dairy consumption in preventing and then consumption after being diagnosed with hormone positive breast cancers. I try to stick with organic forms in limited quantities, but that is based on fear mostly. Now that I have finished chemotherapy, I have requested to again meet with the hospital’s nutritionist to try and get some clearer answers to these questions and also come up with a plan to reduce my weight. Radically changing your diet is another factor and before I meet with the nutritionist I need to review their points so I am better able to go into the discussion with objectives of what I want in a new diet and why.

If you know anyone going through cancer treatments, this might be a great gift for them, depending on their outlook on the treatments and process. Some patients just want to do whatever the doctor tells them and be done and out of there. If your someone is looking to be more active in the treatment and feeling like I was, helpless to really control the situation, I think this is a great place to start!

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. In the form of supplements, a nutrionist is not the best bet. I see a Natropathic Dr. (that specializes in Oncology) monthly and with the supplements she has prescribed for me, they have stabalized the Stage 4 cancer for 11 months now!!! It is definitely worth looking into. 🙂

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    • Such great news for you! I will have to look into finding a natropathic dr in oncology locally . Thank you! I loved the little bit of your blog I looked at last night. Thank you!

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  2. Debbie Haggerty says:

    I am reading the same book. Ron is doing most of these 7 things. We have found that the mainstream doctors are not trained or knowledgeable about supplements or diet. I wish you well on your journey. I have been reading your blogs and want you to know you are in my thoughts and prayers.

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    • Yes, it was really interesting to me how many of these are seemingly a natural reaction and conclusion, yet the mainstream is not talking about them! I had heard he was doing the diet and supplements over the summer. It is hard to weed through some of the information when you can find conflicting information. So impressed by all he has done and how well it is working for him! I think of you both often and keep you in my prayers, as well.

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